Hutchinson Environmental Postdoctoral Fellowship

Overview

The newly established Hutchinson Environmental Program, named in honor of G. Evelyn Hutchinson, the father of modern ecology, is intended to support the environmental priorities identified in Yale’s strategy to advance the sciences.

We seek to attract as many as 10 Hutchinson Environmental Postdoctoral Fellows in the summer and fall of 2020. Cohorts of postdoctoral fellows, representing multiple disciplines, will be centered around the two broad themes outlined below: Environment and Evolution, and Climate and Greenhouse Gases. The Hutchinson Fellows will share space in the Osborn Memorial Laboratories on Yale’s Science Hill. Postdoc cohorts will engage in research and synthesis activities with a network of Yale faculty mentors spanning multiple schools and departments. Priority will be given to applicants whose research incorporates data-driven synthesis, modeling, and/or conceptual unification of knowledge as a means to address these core themes. These are two-year postdoctoral fellowships (contingent on success in year one) with a starting salary of $62,000, plus $10,000 for research and travel. Funds will also be available to support cohort projects, symposia, workshops, and training in science communication.

Research Themes

Click on one of the boxes below to learn about the research themes and corresponding Yale faculty mentors.

THEME I: Environment and Evolution

Human-accelerated environmental changes are affecting the flux of energy and nutrients in ecosystems, in many cases by altering the structure and function of species interactions. We are seeking candidates whose research addresses how species interactions are reshaped by ecological and evolutionary responses to environmental change and/or how this reshaping determines processes and patterns at larger scales. Successful applicants will work in a highly collaborative environment around themes including, but not limited to: (1) eco-evolutionary dynamics in ecosystems driven by human-accelerated change; (2) the genomic basis of evolving species interactions; and (3) contemporary effects of environmental change from a paleoecological perspective.

Faculty lead for Theme I: David Vasseur, Department of Ecology & Evolutionary Biology. Other relevant faculty are affiliated with the Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies, and the Departments of Geology & Geophysics and Anthropology.

Apply now


Affiliated Faculty

Mark Bradford Mark Bradford
Professor of Soils and Ecosystem Ecology, School of Forestry & Environmental Studies
https://bradfordlab.yale.edu
Our lab focuses on understanding how organismal responses to environmental change influence terrestrial carbon cycle processes. As an example, one of our current projects is investigating how fungal-fungal interactions and plasticity are shaped by micro- and macroclimatic variables, and how in turn these fungal community outcomes then drive macroscale patterns in decomposition rates under changing climate. Ultimately, we aim to provide the necessary mechanistic understanding required for reliable prediction of global change impacts on ecosystems, and their likely feedbacks to the climate system. We are particularly interested in working with applicants motivated to incorporate ecological and evolutionary processes into soil biogeochemical models, to test impacts on carbon fluxes and stocks.
Derek E.G. Briggs

Derek E.G. Briggs
G. Evelyn Hutchinson Professor of Geology & Geophysics, Department of Geology and Geophysics
Curator in Charge of Invertebrate Paleontology, Yale Peabody Museum of Natural History
https://people.earth.yale.edu/profile/derek-briggs/about


My research interest is in the preservation and evolutionary significance of exceptionally preserved fossil biotas. The fossil record has acquired an importance as the best guide to the likely impact of climate and other human driven environmental changes – not least in the new field of conservation paleobiology. To understand what it reveals, however, it is essential to understand how marine communities and organism interactions are represented in the fossil record and how changes are reflected in environmental trends and patterns.
Adalgisa Caccone Adalgisa Caccone
Senior Research Scientist, Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
Director, YIBS Center for Genetic Analyses of Biodiversity
https://cgab.yale.edu/people/director
https://cgab.yale.edu/projects
My lab conducts population and individual level DNA analyses to study the evolutionary and ecological processes that shape genomic diversity and translate this information in applied contexts. Our major areas of interest are vector and conservation population genetics/genomics. In both cases we are interested in these main topics: (1) integrating genomic and environmental data to understand the role of climatic changes in shaping species range fluctuation and inter-species interactions, (2) develop novel methods to better predict how species will be impacted by anthropogenic effects, (3) understanding the genetic architecture of complex traits involved in adaptation to novel environment, (4) analyzing the evolution of species interactions, specifically the co-evolution of vectors, hosts, and parasites in face of novel environmental challenges, (5) urban ecological genetics.
Liza Comita Liza Comita
Associate Professor of Tropical Forest Ecology, School of Forestry & Environmental Studies
https://comitalab.yale.edu/
In my lab, we study the mechanisms driving patterns of plant diversity, dynamics, and species distributions in both pristine and human-altered forest ecosystems. We are particularly interested in how interactions between plants and their natural enemies (e.g. pathogens, herbivores) will be altered by human impacts on the environment (e.g. climate change, fragmentation, past land use, selective logging, hunting, etc.). We are also interested in determining the extent to which forest restoration and avoided deforestation, especially in the tropics, can contribute to climate mitigation while simultaneously enhancing biodiversity conservation and local livelihoods.
Michael Donoghue

Michael Donoghue
Sterling Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
https://donoghuelab.yale.edu


My lab has conducted phylogenetic and field studies of mutualistic species interactions, including flowers and their pollinators, fruits and their dispersal agents, and leaves and their protective arthropods.  As one example, in our studies of the hobblebush (Viburnum lantanoides) we noted mis-matches during the early spring in flower opening and pollinator emergence (Park et al., 2019), and we would love to understand how climate change is influencing the timing of these critical events.

Casey Dunn

Casey Dunn
Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
Curator of Invertebrate Zoology, Yale Peabody Museum of Natural History
Professor of Genetics, Yale Combined Program in the Biological and Biomedical Sciences (BBS) (second appointment)
http://dunnlab.org/


Our lab studies the evolution of genomes, development, morphology, and natural history. Our work is centered on organisms, and marine animals in particular. We address questions at larger spatial scales, such as how organism traits impact food web structure, and at smaller spatial scales, such as how genomic changes lead to phenotypic changes.

Erika Edwards Erika Edwards
Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
Director, Marsh Botanical Garden
Curator of Botany, Yale Peabody Museum of Natural History
www.edwardslab.org
My lab group studies the evolutionary origins of complex trait syndromes in plants. We are especially drawn to traits that result from convergent evolution: phenotypes that have arisen many times, in distantly related lineages and within different evolutionary contexts. Our approach is centered on the concept of developing “model lineages” for macroevolution. Our work is highly integrative, and we are typically engaging in some combination of phylogenetics, physiology, anatomy, genomics, and field ecology to answer our questions. We tend to focus on traits that have played especially prominent roles in the adaptation of plant lineages to novel environments. For example, we have worked for some time on the evolution of different photosynthetic systems in plants, and how their evolution is connected to the global carbon cycle. We are also interested in evolutionary transitions between tropical and temperate forests, and between desert and alpine environments.
Eduardo Fernandez-Duque

Eduardo Fernandez-Duque
Professor, Department of Anthropology
Professor, School of Forestry & Environmental Studies
https://fernandezduque.wordpress.com/


I study the behavior, life history and population biology of primates in South America. Our studies in the Amazon forests of Ecuador and the Argentinean Chaco have contributed to understanding the hormonal, genetic and ecological factors driving the evolution of monogamous mating systems.  We look forward to exploring how long-term changes in forest structure, phenology and climate are influencing the population biology of these species and their competitors. 
 

Walter Jetz Walter Jetz
Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
https://jetzlab.yale.edu
Work in our group addresses the patterns and processes behind the distribution of species and their traits in space and time. We are particularly interested in the scale-dependence of both evidence and mechanism in biodiversity science and how environment, ecological, and macroevolutionary mechanisms combine to determine the co-occurrence of species and the structure of assemblages. We aim to use this as basis for assessing the fate of biodiversity and its functions under global change. We work with a variety of systems, both animals and plants, but have to date been particularly active addressing birds and terrestrial vertebrates.
Martha Muñoz Martha Muñoz
Assistant Professor, Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
Affiliate Faculty, Division of Vertebrate Zoology, Yale Peabody Museum of Natural History
www.marthamunoz.com
The Muñoz lab studies how organisms behaviorally interact with their environments and how those interactions impact micro- and macroevolutionary patterns of diversity. We use our discoveries to make informed predictions of species’ vulnerability to ongoing global change. Some ongoing research themes in the lab are: (1) mechanisms of niche evolution; (2) ecological and evolutionary physiology; (3) spatial patterns of biodiversity; (4) form-function evolution; and (5) behavioral evolution. The Muñoz lab works primarily with terrestrial ectotherms (especially reptiles and amphibians), but is open to other study systems.
 
Virginia Pitzer Virginia Pitzer
Associate Professor of Epidemiology, Department of Epidemiology of Microbial Diseases,
Yale School of Public Health
https://medicine.yale.edu/lab/pitzer/
My lab focuses on mathematical and statistical modeling of infectious diseases, with a particular focus on examining the impact of vaccination and other interventions on pathogens such as typhoid, rotavirus, and respiratory syncytial virus. We are interested in examining how environmental factors and climate change drive patterns of infectious disease incidence (see Metcalf et al, 2019), and how this may interact with the ecology and evolution of pathogens.
Noah Planavsky Noah Planavsky
Assistant Professor, Department of Geology and Geophysics
https://earth.yale.edu/yale-metal-geochemistry-center-0
My lab studies global biogeochemical cycles and how they have changed through time. We are particularly interested in reconstructing the evolution of the extent and scope of the biosphere, and how this has been (and will be) impacted by climate perturbations. We also study how and why atmospheric oxygen, methane, and carbon dioxide concentrations have changed over Earth’s history.
David Post David M. Post
Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
https://postlab.yale.edu/
The Post Lab studies the influence of environmental change on communities and ecosystems, eco-evolutionary dynamics, spatial linkages among ecosystems, and complex food web structure and dynamics. We develop and apply stable isotope techniques, and utilize a range of approaches including whole-ecosystem experiments, comparative and paleoecological studies, and meta-analyses to address fundamental and applied questions across ecology and evolutionary biology.
Alvaro Sanchez Alvaro Sanchez
Assistant Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology/Microbial Sciences Institute, Department of Ecology & Evolutionary Biology
www.sanchezlaboratory.com
The Sanchez lab investigates the assembly and evolution of microbial communities. Our research combines mathematical and computational modeling and quantitative experiments to link metabolic and molecular processes with population-level behavior. Our ultimate goal is to develop a quantitative predictive theory of microbiome assembly and its ecological and evolutionary dynamics.
Oswald Schmitz Oswald Schmitz
Oastler Professor of Population and Community Ecology, School of Forestry and Environmental Studies
http://schmitz.environment.yale.edu
My lab group works on the evolutionary ecology of ecosystem functioning. Our research is situated at the nexus of environmental change and ecosystem functioning, examined through the lens of how adaptive responses of organismal functional traits influence food web interactions and ecosystem functions such as nutrient and carbon cycling across broad landscapes. We hope to advance understanding of how variation in the expression of the suite of traits deployed by predators and prey link to variation in ecosystem carbon cycling.    
David Skelly David Skelly
Frank R. Oastler Professor of Ecology, School of Forestry & Environmental Studies
Director, Yale Peabody Museum of Natural History
https://campuspress.yale.edu/skellylab/
Our lab studies the ecological and evolutionary influences of environmental change on animal populations.  We are particularly interested in the means by which species cope with human caused changes such as landscape conversion, the introduction of synthetic chemicals or changing climate.  To what extent are persisting species adapting to altered environments and how quickly and at what spatial scales can such adaptation occur?  We use long term observations as well as field and laboratory experiments to link pattern to mechanism and we seek understanding that can help us make better decisions about the environment.  A lot of the work is on frogs because they live in such a variety of contexts and because they are cool.
Carla Staver Carla Staver
Associate Professor of Plant Ecology, Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
http://staverlab.yale.edu
Our lab studies how climate, soils, fire, and herbivory interact with vegetation to determine vegetation distributions and dynamics in the Earth system. We focus on savanna and forest ecosystems especially in the tropics, combining field and remote sensing approaches with theoretical and computational modeling to understand mechanisms and generate rigorous predictions for the future of the biosphere.
Lidya Tarhan Lidya Tarhan
Assistant Professor, Department of Geology and Geophysics
https://people.earth.yale.edu/profile/lidya-tarhan/about
http://campuspress.yale.edu/lidyatarhan/
My lab’s research focuses on using the sedimentary record to reconstruct the co-evolution of ancient life and environments during critical intervals of Earth’s history. I also study the environmental factors controlling animal-sediment interactions in modern marine settings. My research approach combines field-based sedimentological and (paleo)ecological investigations with a geochemical-, petrographic- and modeling-based toolkit. My recent work has centered on reconstructing the environmental settings and ecology of the earliest animal ecosystems, tracking the emergence of bioturbating (burrowing and sediment-mixing) animals as ecosystem engineers and constraining quantitative relationships between bioturbation and microbial redox cycling in modern coastal sediments.
Jessica Thompson Jessica Thompson
Assistant Professor, Department of Anthropology
https://anthropology.yale.edu/people/jessica-thompson
I am a paleoanthropologist who specializes in analysis of animal remains from hominin sites. In the Paleoarchaeology Lab, we examine ancient human-environment interactions primarily using fossil and subfossil evidence. My backgrounds in taphonomy, GIS, and field archaeology serve me in two major projects. The first, in Ethiopia, is an examination of how our Pliocene hominin ancestors first moved into a more omnivorous niche, and what the evolutionary consequences were of this behavior. The second, in Malawi, is an investigation of changing human behavior and concurrent paleoenvironmental changes across the Pleistocene-Holocene boundary. I have recently begun to move more deliberately into research that examines the recursive effects of Pliocene hominins and Pleistocene humans on the ecosystems they inhabit. Members of my lab group study the paleobiogeography, taphonomy, and isotopic signatures of animal remains as the main proxies for these interactions.
Paul Turner Paul E. Turner
Rachel Carson Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
http://turnerlab.yale.edu/
My laboratory studies the ecology, evolutionary genetics and genomics of microbes, especially interacting viruses and hosts within populations and communities that evolve in changing environments. Human-accelerated environmental changes affect all biota, including microbes. Phenotypic analysis, deep-sequencing and metagenomics of microcosm experiments can illuminate eco-evolutionary dynamics, and help refine predictions of microbial evolvability in the face of environmental change, as well as estimates of extinction risks experienced by microbial species.
Claudia Valeggia Claudia Valeggia
Professor of Anthropology, Department of Anthropology
https://claudiavaleggia.com/
The Reproductive Ecology Lab focuses on the interaction between the environment and reproductive function in human and non-human primates. Among other questions, we are currently working on the endocrine correlates of life history transitions in women, the effects of environmental endocrine disruptors on infant development, and the association of paternal care and metabolic hormones in owl monkeys (Aotus azarai).
David Vasseur David Vasseur
Associate Professor, Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
https://vasseurlab.yale.edu
Research in my lab incorporates theory and laboratory experiments to study the ecological and evolutionary responses to environmental variation and to the variation that exists amongst individuals.  Within this broader focus, two themes currently dominate my lab’s activities.  The first is aimed at understanding the consequences of thermal variation in space and time on the fitness of individuals and populations.  In addition to models of evolutionary rescue and behavioral microclimate use, we are carrying out experiments to better characterize the ecological effects of thermal acclimation in order to improve ecological forecasts.  The second theme aims to characterize how the incorporation of intraspecific variation impacts ecological paradigms such as coexistence and the stability of ecosystems.

Additional faculty members may be published at any time; please check back for updates.

THEME II: Climate and Greenhouse Gases

Atmospheric levels of CO2, CH4 and N2O are increasing, leading to planetary warming. We are seeking candidates whose research can contribute to our general understanding of the generation and management of greenhouse gases (GHG). Because of growing interest in global methane among a group of Yale faculty, we are particularly interested in building a cohort of postdoctoral fellows who can advance knowledge of the production and control of CH4 losses from natural and human-managed systems. Successful applicants will work in a highly collaborative environment around themes including, but not limited to: (1) GHG fluxes from ecosystems and the energy sector; (2) microbial ecology and evolution relevant to GHGs; (3) GHG pathways in plants; (4) GHG dynamics in deep time; and (5) natural climate solutions.

Faculty lead for Theme II: Peter Raymond, Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies. Other relevant faculty are affiliated with the Departments of Geology & Geophysics, Ecology & Evolutionary Biology, Chemical & Environmental Engineering, and the Yale School of Management.

Apply now


Affiliated Faculty

Mark S. Ashton Mark S. Ashton
Morris K. Jesup Professor of Silviculture and Forest Ecology, School of Forestry and Environmental Studies
https://silviculturelab.yale.edu/
Our lab group works on understanding the patterns and processes of regenerating native forests with application to the development and testing of silvicultural techniques for native forest restoration on degraded lands. As such we seek to develop resilient mitigation and adaptation strategies for reforestation in changing climates.
 
Mark Bradford Mark Bradford
Professor of Soils and Ecosystem Ecology, School of Forestry & Environmental Studies
https://bradfordlab.yale.edu
Our lab focuses on understanding how organismal responses to environmental change influence terrestrial carbon cycle processes. As an example, one of our current projects is investigating how fungal-fungal interactions and plasticity are shaped by micro- and macroclimatic variables, and how in turn these fungal community outcomes then drive macroscale patterns in decomposition rates under changing climate. Ultimately, we aim to provide the necessary mechanistic understanding required for reliable prediction of global change impacts on ecosystems, and their likely feedbacks to the climate system. We are particularly interested in working with applicants motivated to incorporate ecological and evolutionary processes into soil biogeochemical models, to test impacts on carbon fluxes and stocks.
Derek E.G. Briggs

Derek E.G. Briggs
G. Evelyn Hutchinson Professor of Geology & Geophysics, Department of Geology and Geophysics
Curator in Charge of Invertebrate Paleontology, Yale Peabody Museum of Natural History
https://people.earth.yale.edu/profile/derek-briggs/about


My research interest is in the preservation and evolutionary significance of exceptionally preserved fossil biotas. The fossil record has acquired an importance as the best guide to the likely impact of climate and other human driven environmental changes – not least in the new field of conservation paleobiology. To understand what it reveals, however, it is essential to understand how marine communities and organism interactions are represented in the fossil record and how changes are reflected in environmental trends and patterns.

Craig Broderson Craig Brodersen
Associate Professor of Physiological Plant Ecology, School of Forestry & Environmental Studies
http://campuspress.yale.edu/brodersenlab/
My lab group is focused on structure-function relationships in the transport systems in plants; specifically, the vascular systems and their linkage to the evaporative and absorptive surfaces in leaves. We use a combination of methods, including high-resolution X-ray microCT imaging, to study these systems in three-dimensions and in-planta as a means of characterizing physiological thresholds during stressful events like drought. Another long-term goal of our research program is to understand how the natural diversity in photosynthetic and hydraulic systems of plants might be used for the design of novel materials and designs to mitigate rising atmospheric CO2.
Indy Burke Indy Burke
Carl W. Knobloch Jr. Dean and Professor of Ecosystem Ecology, School of Forestry & Environmental Studies
http://www.indyburke.org
I am an ecosystem ecologist with expertise in carbon and nitrogen cycling in semiarid ecosystems.  My work with graduate students and colleagues has addressed the influence of land use management, climatic variability, and regional variability on these systems.
Liza Comita Liza Comita
Associate Professor of Tropical Forest Ecology, School of Forestry & Environmental Studies
https://comitalab.yale.edu/
In my lab, we study the mechanisms driving patterns of plant diversity, dynamics, and species distributions in both pristine and human-altered forest ecosystems. We are particularly interested in how interactions between plants and their natural enemies (e.g. pathogens, herbivores) will be altered by human impacts on the environment (e.g. climate change, fragmentation, past land use, selective logging, hunting, etc.). We are also interested in determining the extent to which forest restoration and avoided deforestation, especially in the tropics, can contribute to climate mitigation while simultaneously enhancing biodiversity conservation and local livelihoods.
Robert Dubrow

Robert Dubrow
Professor of Epidemiology, Department of Environmental Health Sciences
School of Public Health
Faculty Director, Yale Climate Change and Health Initiative
https://publichealth.yale.edu/climate/


I am interested in the relationship between ambient temperature and humidity and adverse health outcomes, especially kidney disease. I am also interested in the benefits and harms of air conditioning in the context of health and climate change. Air conditioning is highly protective against heat-related morbidity and mortality. However, air conditioning also confers harms by contributing to peak electricity demand, greenhouse gas and particulate matter emissions, and the urban heat island effect. How do we achieve the benefits of indoor cooling while avoiding the harms? 

Erika Edwards Erika Edwards
Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
Director, Marsh Botanical Garden
Curator of Botany, Yale Peabody Museum of Natural History
www.edwardslab.org
My lab group studies the evolutionary origins of complex trait syndromes in plants. We are especially drawn to traits that result from convergent evolution: phenotypes that have arisen many times, in distantly related lineages and within different evolutionary contexts. Our approach is centered on the concept of developing “model lineages” for macroevolution. Our work is highly integrative, and we are typically engaging in some combination of phylogenetics, physiology, anatomy, genomics, and field ecology to answer our questions. We tend to focus on traits that have played especially prominent roles in the adaptation of plant lineages to novel environments. For example, we have worked for some time on the evolution of different photosynthetic systems in plants, and how their evolution is connected to the global carbon cycle. We are also interested in evolutionary transitions between tropical and temperate forests, and between desert and alpine environments.
Drew R. Gentner Drew R. Gentner
Associate Professor, Chemical & Environmental Engineering
Associate Professor, Forestry & Environmental Studies
http://www.gentner.yale.edu/
My research includes a focus on emissions of climate-relevant pollutants (gases and aerosols) from energy- and non-energy-related sources, and measurements of their spatiotemporal variability in the atmosphere, including using new networks such as those developed as part of Yale’s SEARCH Center.
Jordan Peccia Jordan Peccia
Thomas E. Golden Professor of Environmental Engineering, Department of Chemical and Environmental Engineering
https://www.eng.yale.edu/peccialab/
My lab merges microbiology and microbial genetics with computational approaches to address environmental problems in energy, climate, and human health. We are currently interested in how environmental conditions influence gene expression and regulate methanogenesis and methanotrophy in natural and engineered systems.
 
Noah Planavsky Noah Planavsky
Assistant Professor, Department of Geology and Geophysics
https://earth.yale.edu/yale-metal-geochemistry-center-0
My lab studies global biogeochemical cycles and how they have changed through time. We are particularly interested in reconstructing the evolution of the extent and scope of the biosphere, and how this has been (and will be) impacted by climate perturbations. We also study how and why atmospheric oxygen, methane, and carbon dioxide concentrations have changed over Earth’s history.
Peter Raymond

Peter Raymond
Professor of Ecosystem Ecology, School of Forestry & Environmental Studies
Director, Yale Analytic and Stable Isotope Center
https://environment.yale.edu/profile/raymond/
https://earth.yale.edu/yasic-yale-analytical-and-stable-isotope-center


The Raymond lab studies the exchange of greenhouse gases between aquatic systems and the atmosphere.  We do this through both field/lab work and regional to global scaling.  For this effort we are interested in continuing our effort to increase the knowledge base on what controls methane fluxes from inundated systems and scaling these fluxes from ecosystems to the globe.

James Saiers James E. Saiers
Clifton R. Musser Professor of Hydrology, School of Environmental Studies
https://environment.yale.edu/content/profiles/docs/saiers-cv.pdf?1574099505
My lab has conducted field and modeling studies of the effects of natural processes and energy-resource extraction on the fluxes of methane and other pollutants in streams, soils, and groundwater aquifers.  As one example (Barth-Naftilan et al. 2018), we evaluated how hydraulic fracturing and its attendant processes affected methane concentrations in drinking-water aquifers that overly the natural-gas bearing Marcellus Shale. More generally, we are seeking to advance a process-based understanding of the spatial and temporal variability of methane exchange between different watershed reservoirs and the atmosphere.
Carla Staver Carla Staver
Associate Professor of Plant Ecology, Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
http://staverlab.yale.edu
Our lab studies how climate, soils, fire, and herbivory interact with vegetation to determine vegetation distributions and dynamics in the Earth system. We focus on savanna and forest ecosystems especially in the tropics, combining field and remote sensing approaches with theoretical and computational modeling to understand mechanisms and generate rigorous predictions for the future of the biosphere.
Julie Zimmerman Julie Zimmerman
Professor, School of Forestry and Environmental Studies
Professor, Department of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, School of Engineering and Applied Sciences
https://zimmermanlab.yale.edu/
My lab is interested in mitigating climate change through the development of greener processes for chemical and material synthesis, particularly starting from renewable and waste feedstocks.  We are particularly interested in advancing the integrated biorefinery to produce drop-in or novel chemicals that do not rely on petroleum feedstocks and synthesizing high value materials, particularly nano materials, with reduced energy demand by developing new synthetic routes and processes.

Additional faculty members may be published at any time; please check back for updates.

Applications

Interested candidates should have, or will soon receive, a Ph.D. in a relevant discipline. Applications must be submitted by Monday, January 13, 2020. Submit a CV (with a complete bibliography), the names and email addresses of three references, and a research statement detailing potential connections to one (or both) of the themes described above; please also identify one or more potential Yale faculty mentors. Applications should be submitted to http://apply.interfolio.com/71435. Applicants will be notified of the results of the selection process by mid-February 2020.

Apply now


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